Tag Archives: coconut

Coconut Pumpkin Pie with an Almond Crust

I better get a move on with all these recipes. Christmas is almost here and I’m still trying to catch upon everything from Thanksgiving! So I’ll keep this post short and sweet.

What: Coconut Pumpkin Pie with an Almond Crust

Where: From 101 Cookbooks

Why it’s special: The filling is made with coconut milk and the edge is lined with roasted almond paste. (The paste SHOULD have been a spread for the crust, but I forgot and only remembered last minute to use it.)

Coconut Pumpkin Pie (recipe adapted from 101 Cookbooks and Butter)

INGREDIENTS

Crust (Makes enough for 2)

3 cups plain flour
1/2 cup super fine sugar
1 1/4 cups (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, cold and cubed
2 egg yolks
4 tbsp cold water
1 tsp vanilla extract

Filling

2 cups hazelnuts (divided) , toasted (I used almonds.)
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 tablespoon pumpkin pie spic
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon arrowroot (or cornstarch)
1 1/2 cups unsweetened pumpkin puree
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 extra large eggs PLUS one for glaze, lightly beaten
1 cup coconut milk

METHOD

For the crust

  1. Put the flour, sugar and butter into a food processor or stand mixer. Mix on a low speed until mixture resembles very coarse breadcrumbs.
  2. Add the egg yolks, cold water and vanilla, and process until a dough forms.
  3. Form two disc from the  dough and wrap each separately in plastic wrap. Refrigerate for at least an hour.

For the nut paste

  1. Puree 1 1/2 cups of the toasted hazelnuts in a food processor until they turn into a hazelnut paste, past the ‘crumble’ stage. Set aside.
  2. Chop the remaining 1/2 cup of hazelnuts and set aside separately, these will be sprinkled on top after the pie is baked. (I forgot this entire part and only as an afterthought did I use the paste to line the edge of the pie. Spread on the crust would have been better.)

For the filling

  1. To make the pumpkin pie filling, whisk together the brown sugar, pumpkin pie spice blend, salt and arrowroot. Stir in the pumpkin puree, and vanilla. Now stir in the eggs and coconut milk until just combined. Set aside.

Assembly

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 F. When you are ready to make your pie, remove one of the discs of pastry from the fridge. (The other you can save for your next pie.)
  2. On a lightly floured surface, or between two sheets of baking paper, roll out the dough until it is big enough to line your pie dish.
  3. Lightly flour the dough and gently roll it up onto your rolling pin. Then unroll it into your pie dish, easing it in and pressing it into any edges. Trim the excess pastry, leaving a 2cm (1 inch) overhang.
  4. Before filling the pie crust, crumble the hazelnut paste on top of the pie dough into the pie plate, quickly and gently press it into a thin layer across the bottom creating a layer of hazelnuts that will sit between the dough and the filling. Using the last egg gently brush the decorative edges of the pie dough. Use a fork to prick the pie dough a few times to prevent air bubbles.
  5. Fill the pie crust with the filling and bake for about 50 minutes – the center of the pie should just barely jiggle when you move the pie – the edges should be set.
  6. Let the pie cool a bit, this makes slicing less messy. Serve straight or with a dollop of bourbon-spiked, sweetened whipped cream or creme fraiche and a sprinkling of chopped hazelnuts.

Someone's excited for pie!


Another Portland Thanksgiving

image

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I’m home again. I baked, I ate, I traditioned. After all that, I’m ready for sleep.

I’ll write about the pies tomorrow.

Ciao ciao and happy thanksgiving

Theresa

Haupia

A gift from my friend Candice. Delicious, creamy coconut pudding from Hawaii.

And it came from a mix.


Oatmeal Raisin Cookies with Coconut and Walnuts

I avoided oatmeal cookies and all things oatmeal related for many years. Not exactly sure why. Actually, I remember watching a cartoon version of Oliver Twist or some other orphan rags-to-riches story (where all the characters are played by cats). There’s that famous scene in the mess hall in which Oliver asks, “Please, sir, can I have some more”—some more totally gross gruel that plops and slaps onto the plate and then jiggles when it lands. I think from that time, I associated oatmeal and oatmeal cookies, cream of wheat and any kind of breakfast cereal with sad, little Oliver and the grody glop he had to eat.

Some time last year, I decided to get over this fear of breakfast cereal. It’s good stuff. Let’s face it, though, hot oatmeal isn’t pretty—it just looks gross, bubbling and slopping around in the pot—but it’s love food. From your mom, to your kids, to your loved ones and to yourself. Because it’s so good for you. But I’m digressing. I didn’t make oatmeal; I made oatmeal cookies. They’re not exactly good for you (so much sugar and butter), but they are mighty fine and tasty.

The recipe I ended up going with is one from Smitten Kitchen, which I found on The Nerd’s Wife’s website (cute name). It’s half of the original, I believe, which is perfect because one dozen regular sized cookies is plenty. I followed the instructions exactly, except I did everything by hand (being stand mixer-less) and added giant coconut flakes and walnut pieces to the mix. I’ve listed both as optional, but would highly suggest putting them in! More texture, more flavor, you know? Also, I baked for 10 minutes. The cookies were still a bit goopy in the middle, but that’s how they should be. As they cool on the silicon mat, they firm up, at which point you can move them to a rack to cool. My friend Natalie and I couldn’t wait; as soon as they were firm enough, we gobbled them up (one each—we’re not gluttons 😛 )

Anyway, try them. The cookies are soft and chewy and stay that way for a few days.

Enjoy!

Oatmeal Raisin Cookies with Coconut and Walnuts (adapted from Smitten Kitchen via The Nerd’s Wife)

printable recipe

Makes one dozen standard-sized cookies.

INGREDIENTS

1/2 cup (1 stick or 4 oz) butter, softened

2/3 cup light brown sugar, packed

1 large egg, at room temp.

1/2 tsp vanilla extract

3/4 cup all purpose flour

1/2 tsp baking soda

1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

1/4 tsp salt

1 1/4 cups rolled oats

3/4 cup raisins

1/4 cup large coconut flakes (optional)

1/2 cup walnuts, roughly chopped or broken up with hands (optional)

METHOD

  1. Pre-heat oven to 350 F.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer, cream together the sugars, butter, egg and vanilla.
  3. In a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, soda, cinnamon and salt.
  4. Add the flour mixture to the sugar mixture and mix well.
  5. Add the oats, raisins, coconut flakes and walnuts; stir together well.
  6. Drop by the tablespoon on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper or a silicone mat. They should be about two inches apart. (I made two batches of 6 each.)
  7. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes until the edges have just started to turn brown. (They’ll be quite soft and the centers still gooey when they come out, but don’t worry; they should be.)
  8. Let them cool for a bit to firm up before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.

Crazy for You Coconut Rice Pudding

I do love rice pudding: it’s rich and creamy, involves very little chewing (I’m not lazy, just a slow eater) and can be eaten with a little spoon, slowly, one delicate bite at a time. I also adore coconut and in all forms, edible and not: in savory dishes and sweet desserts, in body lotions, in candles and in perfumes. So you can imagine how happy coconut rice pudding makes me!

This recipe (an adapted Dorie Greenspan courtesy of Slow Like Honey) is actually incredible. I think it’s because most of the “cooking” is actually done in the refrigerator. The pudding sits in the fridge for at least 6 hours, the rice slowly absorbing the coconut milk. I never want to eat plain rice pudding ever again! Oh, joy, and this is so simple to make too. I changed the amounts a bit, but followed the directions as stated. That said, I think you could just as easily skip some of the steps, like the whole parboiling business—I’m pretty sure no major harm would come of skipping this. However, though listed as optional, do please add raisins and do serve it topped with chopped almonds; they make every biteful full of crunch and juicy pop.

Enjoy!

Coconut Rice Pudding (adapted from Dorie Greenspan’s Baking: From My Home To Yours via Slow Like Honey)

printable recipe

INGREDIENTS

scant 1/2 cup Arborio rice

2 cups water

1-13.5 oz can unsweetened coconut milk

1 cup whole milk

1/3 cup sugar

1 tbsp vanilla extract

1/3 cup raisins or other dried fruit of your choice (optional)

handful almonds, roughly chopped (optional)

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Put the rice and water in a heavy-bottomed saucepan and bring to a boil. Lower the temperature and cook the rice, uncovered, for 10 minutes. Drain the rice in a strainer and rinse it; set aside.
  2. Rinse out the saucepan, then pour in the whole milk and coconut milk, stir in the sugar, and set the pan over medium heat. When the milk mixture boils, stir in the parboiled rice and raisins. Reduce the heat to low and let the mixture bubble away gently, stirring occasionally, for about 30 minutes. As the pudding gets close to done, the rice kernels will be visible in the boiling milk- you’ll see them floating under the top layer of milk. The pudding won’t be thick- that’s okay (it will thicken in the refrigerator)- but the rice will be soft and it will have absorbed 80 to 90 percent of the milk.
  3. Remove the pan from the heat and decide what flavor you’d like the pudding to be- add either the vanilla or chocolate and stir gently until it is fully blended in to the pudding.
  4. Pour the pudding into a serving bowl or into individual cups or bowls. Press plastic wrap against the surface of the pudding to prevent it from forming a skin, and refrigerate for at least 6 hours, until thoroughly cold. Serve topped with chopped almonds.

Red Velvet Cupcakes with Coconut Cream Cheese Frosting

When I think red velvet, I think Rhett Butler and Scarlett O’Hara—sitting in a grand dining hall, dressed in ball gowns AND eating red velvet cake. Well, Rhett wouldn’t have worn a dress, but they could have eaten cupcakes.

For my first experience with this cake, I have to admit slight disappointment. At least I can cross it off my list of “Must Try” foods. Without the frosting, all I taste is a cavity waiting to happen. Taste aside, however, as a cake or cupcake, they’re absolutely gorgeous, like seriously stunning. The deep, intense red is so sexy. I loooove it!

So I followed the recipe exactly, except for the frosting, to which I added a cup of coconut flakes—because coconut makes everything taste better. This makes 24 cupcakes, but I halved the amounts and just made 12.

Enjoy!

Red Velvet Cupcakes (ever so slightly adapted from Cook’s Illustrated via Gonna Want Seconds)

printable recipe

Makes 24 cupcakes or two 9-inch cake layers

INGREDIENTS

Cake

2 1/4 cups (11 1/4 ounces) all-purpose flour

1 1/2 teaspoon baking soda

pinch of table salt

1 cup buttermilk or 1 cup whole or reduced-fat milk plus 1 tbsp lemon juice (let sit for at least 10 min.)

1 tablespoon white vinegar

1 teaspoon vanilla

2 large eggs

2 tablespoons natural cocoa powder

1-1 ounce bottle red food coloring

12 tablespoons (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened

1 1/2 cups (10 1/2 ounces) granulated sugar

Coconut Cream Cheese Frosting

16 tablespoons (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened

4 cups (16 ounces) confectioner’s sugar

16 ounces cream cheese, softened and cut into 8 pieces

1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla

pinch of table salt

1 cup dried, unsweetened grated coconut, optional

METHOD

Cake

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour two 9-inch cake pans or line cupcake pans with liners.
  2. In a medium bowl mix flour, baking soda and salt.
  3. In another bowl add buttermilk, vinegar, vanilla and eggs and whisk to combine.
  4. Sift cocoa into a small bowl the mix with food coloring until it forms a paste.
  5. Beat butter and sugar together, in a standing mixer, set on medium, for 2 minutes. Scrape down bowl.
  6. Add 1/3 of flour mixture and and beat on medium speed just until it’s incorporated. Add 1/2 the buttermilk mixture and beat on low until combined.  Scrape down the bowl. Add 1/3 of flour mixture and beat on medium until incorporate. Add the rest of buttermilk mixture beat on low until combine. Add last 1/3 of flour mixture and beat on medium until just combined.  Scrape down the bowl.
  7. Add the cocoa paste mixture and beat on medium until incorporated. Scrape down the bowl and make sure the bottom of the batter is incorporating as well. Give the batter a final good stir with a rubber spoonula to mix completely and pour into prepared pans.
  8. Bake cake/cupcakes in preheated oven about 25 minutes for cake and 20 minutes for cupcakes or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. (18 would’ve sufficed for me.) Cool cakes in pans 10 minutes, then turn out onto wire rack to cool completely, at least 30 minutes.

Frosting

  1. In a stand mixer, beat butter and sugar on medium until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Add cream cheese, 1 piece at a time, and beat until incorporate. Beat in vanilla, salt and if using, grated coconut. Spread or pipe on completely cooled cakes/cupcakes.

Flan de Coco (Coconut Flan)

Christmas is only 9 days away and I’m still posting about Thanksgiving! So, no time for witty anecdotes–just a recipe for this unbelievable coconut flan, my new favorite dessert. Flan is so versatile! I’m making an eggnog version for Christmas!

By the way, for the perfect caramel, I referred to David Lebovitz’ post “Making the Perfect Caramel” found here.

Enjoy!

Flan de Coco (adapted from Laylita’s Recipes)

printable recipe

INGREDIENTS

1 cup sugar

6 eggs

1 can of coconut milk

1 cup grated coconut (I used dried unsweetened, but perhaps fresh would have been better)

3/4 cup sugar

1 can of evaporated milk

3 tbsp corn starch

Pinch of salt

METHOD

  1. Start with an even layer of sugar in a saucepan over medium high heat to make caramel. Bring to a boil, dragging the sugar at the edges inward as it browns. Cook until the caramel starts to turn a light brown honey color, but be careful as it can burn very quickly.
  2. Pour caramel into ramekins or flan mold and distribute evenly. (I used a square 8 x 8 x 1.5 inch baking pan.)
  3. Pre-heat oven to 350 F. Place water in a large baking pan, the water should fill up to no more than 1/2 of the height of the ramekins or baking pan.
  4. Using an electric mixer, mix eggs, coconut milk, grated coconut, sugar, evaporated milk, corn starch and pinch of salt together until all the ingredients are well blended.
  5. Add the flan mixture to ramekins or baking pan.
  6. Place the ramekins or baking pan into the prepared pan with water and bake for 40-50 minutes. Allow to cool completely, remove from the molds or baking pan and serve. (I refrigerated mine overnight, so that the caramel could completely liquify and become nice and syrupy!)

Mochi Cake

I love mochi–in soup, filled with sweet beans in daifuku form, or toasted, dipped in soy sauce and sugar and wrapped in nori. Growing up, though, I was actually scared of it. Every New Year’s Day, my mom would make ozoni, Japanese mochi soup, and every year she would warn us kids to eat it slowly–because if we didn’t we would choke and maybe die! I guess I can see how it could happen–it’s really sticky and when added to soup, it becomes kind of thick and hard to swallow. It’s like when you buy bubble tea; the label always includes some “use caution when swallowing” warning because you don’t want one of those little tapioca pearls getting stuck in your throat.

All grown up, I can proudly say I have worked through my mochi issue and am now able to eat it without fear 🙂

When I heard about mochi cake for the first time, I was really excited by the idea! And when I tried it for the first time, oddly enough in Lima, I couldn’t stop eating it, it was that good. Since then, I’ve been dying to make it myself. Yesterday, I finally had the time.

The recipe I found on Week of Menus couldn’t have been simpler. (You don’t even have to think ahead to take the butter out to warm to room temperature—something I always forget to do.) Whisk, whisk, pour, bake and serve. Love that.

So what did I think? It was perfectly moist and had this amazing chewy texture—via the rice flour—and yet, something was missing: the coconut? I poured two whole cans (28 oz) of coconut milk in there, but I couldn’t actually taste any coconut flavor in the finished product. Where’d it go?? In all honestly, I made this because a) I’m crazy for mochi and b) I’m even more coo-coo for coconut. What a let down that was. So I’m a bit disappointed, not necessarily in the recipe (I made one 9×13 panful yesterday and they are already all gone—a sign that they must be good), but in myself. Because I didn’t love this as much as I hoped I would. I think it was the coconut. Next time, I’ll maybe add flaked coconut or maybe coconut essence to up the flavor. I might also try using evaporated or condensed milk too.

Mochi Cake via Week of Menus

Makes one 9×13 pan, or 24 squares

INGREDIENTS

1 lb box (3 cups) mochiko flour

2 1/2 cups sugar

2 tsp baking powder

1/4 tsp salt

2-14 oz cans coconut milk (full fat)

5 large eggs

1/2 stick unsalted butter, melted and slightly cooled

1 tsp vanilla extract

METHOD

  1. Preheat oven to 350. Grease a 9X13 baking pan.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together mochiko flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt.
  3. In a separate bowl or large measuring cup (4 cup capacity), beat eggs, then add coconut milk, melted butter and vanilla extract.
  4. Carefully pour the wet ingredients over the mochiko flour mixture and whisk until mixture is smooth and uniform in texture.
  5. Pour batter into greased 9X13 pan. Carefully smooth out the top.
  6. Bake for 90 minutes, until top is golden brown and the cake begins to pull away from the sides of the pan.
  7. Allow cake to cool for about 30 minutes on a rack, and then carefully flip it out and cut into 24 squares, or the size of your choice. Can store mochi cake for three days, covered.

Carrot Cake with Dulce de Leche Buttercream

A lot of things got put on hold after I left for Peru, including this blog! But now I am back and so is Little Baker SF 🙂 I made this cake for someone’s birthday a few months back, but never got around to posting it…probably because the only picture I took I ended up trashing. It looked like someone had attacked it with claws! Actually, “it” was 50 hungry birthday guests 😛 I’m taking it as a compliment!

In making this, I pulled from two sources: Vanilla Sugar for the cake itself and Joy the Baker for the buttercream and for assembly help. Both awesome recipes (and amazing blogs), I’m really pleased with the way they paired together in the final product. (Not that there could ever be anything wrong with carrot cake, dulce de leche and frosting—together or apart.)

The cake has everything a carrot cake should: sweetness from the carrots and raisins, spice from the cinnamon and nutmeg and crunch from the pecans. And the dulce de leche buttercream…dreamy.

Make it. You’ll love it.

Believe me.

Birthday Carrot Cake with Dulce De Leche Buttercream

Makes 1 two-layer 23 cm cake

INGREDIENTS

Carrot Cake (via Vanilla Sugar)

2 1/2 cups all purpose flour

1 1/4 tsp baking powder

1 tsp baking soda

1 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon

1/2 tsp ground nutmeg

1/8 tsp ground cloves (I omitted this.)

1/2 tsp table salt

1 lb. medium carrots (about 6-7), peeled

1 1/2 cups granulated sugar

1/2 cup packed brown sugar (I omitted this too.)

4 large eggs

1 1/2 cups vegetable or canola oil

1 1/2 cups raisins

1 cup pecans, roughly chopped

Dulche de Leche Buttercream (from The Pastry Queen via Joy the Baker)

1 1/2 cups unsalted butter, softened

3 tbsp heavy cream (I used reduced-fat milk)

1 tsp vanilla extract

4 cups powdered sugar

a pinch of salt

3/4 cup prepared dulce de leche (I used Nestle’s Manjar Blanco available in Peru)

METHOD

Cake

  1. Adjust oven rack to middle position; heat oven to 350 F / 175 C. Spray two 23 cm springform tins with nonstick cooking spray. Line bottom of pan with parchment and spray parchment.
  2. Whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, and salt in large bowl; set aside.
  3. Shred carrots, which should yield about 3 cups. Transfer the carrots to a bowl and set aside.
  4. With a whisk or hand mixer, process granulated and brown sugars and eggs until frothy and thoroughly combined, about 20 seconds. Still whisking or with the hand mixer running, add oil in a steady stream. Whisk or mix until the batter is light in color and well emulsified, about 20 seconds longer. Scrape mixture into medium bowl. Stir in carrots and dry ingredients until incorporated and no streaks of flour remain. Finally, gently stir in the raisins and chopped pecans until just combined.
  5. Pour batter into prepared pan and bake at 350 F / 175 C until toothpick or skewer inserted into center of cake comes out clean, 45-50 minutes, rotating pan halfway through baking time. Cool cake to room temperature in pan on wire rack, about 2 hours. (If you omit raisins and nuts, reduce baking time by 10-15 minutes.)

Buttercream

  1. Cream together softened butter and powdered sugar on low using an electric mixer.
  2. Add the milk and vanilla and beat on medium speed until smooth and no lumps appear.  Scrape down the sides of the bowl.
  3. Add the prepared dulce de leche and beat to incorporate.  Set aside until ready to use. (Do not refrigerate; it will harden and will not spread if you do.)

Assembly (adapted from Joy the Baker)

  1. On your cake platter or plate, lay the first cake layer top-side up. If uneven, use a serrated knife to trim.
  2. Put about 3/4 of the frosting into the center of the cake layer. Then with an frosting spatula, spread the frosting evenly around the cake surface until you reach the edges.
  3. On a second cake plate, lay the second cake layer, again, top-side up. As with the first layer, if it is uneven, trim with a serrated knife. Next, carefully lay it top-side down onto the first cake layer, onto the frosting.
  4. Gently press the top of the cake down to make sure it is even. Dollop about 1 cup of frosting onto the center of the top of the cake and, again, using your frosting spatula, spread the frosting evenly around the cake surface towards the edges of the cake. Smooth the center. (Frosting will accumulate at the edges if there is excess, which is fine. You will use it to frost the sides.)
  5. Run the frosting spatula under hot water. (This will help you smooth the icing out.) With your clean spatula, scoop up some frosting and spread it across the sides of the cake. Keep doing this until, turning the cake, until all sides are frosted and somewhat smooth. (Don’t worry if it’s not smooth; you will smooth it out the second time you apply frosting.)
  6. Clean your spatula again. With a light but firm touch, place the front edge of the icing spatula along the seam where the side of the cake meets the top of the cake.  (Icing has accumulated here and is creating a rough border to the cake.)  Hold the spatula firmly in one place along this icing seam and slowly being to rotate the revolving cake stand—moving the cake, but not the knife, to smooth the top.  You can leave the icing as rough and rustic, or smooth as you’d like. Clean any stray icing at the base of the cake, or on the cake board with a damp paper towel.

Trail Mix Bread

I’m housesitting for my parents right now. Part of my official housesitter duties includes taking care of the three exchange students my parents have living with them. It could have been a lot of work, but luckily, these kids (almost adults) are superstar students who need very little care from me. All I do is prepare two meals a day, breakfast and dinner. I actually kind of like doing it. I get up every morning to make breakfast, chat with them about school and their plans, and then during the day, I do my own thing. In the evening, I prepare whatever I feel like making, and so far, they’ve seemed pretty satisfied!

Today, I felt like baking bread. Outside is gray and quiet, which is not very motivating for getting things done. Baking—and baking for others—I’ve found is the best way to spend still days like these. The kids will appreciate it too, i.e. breakfast rolls!

I threw together this whole wheat bread with a delightful little mix of raisins, almonds, white chocolate chips and coconut flakes. Perfect for breakfast, and now that I think of it, ideal for taking along on a hike. It’s trail mix in bread form!  The recipe is one I found a while back on zestycook.com and is already a favorite because of the short ingredients list and simple method. I didn’t feel like futzing around with scales or complicated dough starters, so this recipe is exactly what I needed. The original used 2/3 cup each of raisins and walnuts; I skipped the walnuts and added white chocolate chips, coconut flakes and almonds in their place; I was also a little more generous in the amounts of each. (Why? Because those little “bits” you find in your morning bread are the best part!!)

Once you mix everything together and finish proofing (which I did in the bread machine), you can form the dough into the traditional loaf or you can do as I did and use your muffin tin. I was nervous about the bread sticking (the dough, at least mine, is pretty wet), but because I floured the tin before filling, sticking was very minimal. I thought this was a pretty genius idea on my part—scoop the dough into the tins and allow to finish proofing and bypass the messy, sticky part of shaping and moving the dough. Nice!

Golden, crunchy crust and sweet middle with lots of bits!! I WILL be making this again. Probably this week!

P.S. No pictures for now. I had a little theft incident in Lima (too scary to write about), which left me camera-less and also a little traumatized. This last week I ordered a new camera, which is supposed to arrive this week…

It’s here—my camera—and it’s pink!! Took a few pics of the last of the bread, and actually, it sttill tastes pretty good 🙂

Trail Mix Bread

recipe adapted from zestycook.com

INGREDIENTS

2 cups lukewarm water

2 1/4 tsp active dry yeast (or one 1/4-oz. packet)

2 tbsp runny honey (I used clover)

2 3/4 cup whole wheat flour

1 1/2 to 2 cups all purpose flour (I used 1 1/2, which is why my dough was wetter, but which turned out fine.)

2/ tsp salt

1/2 cup raisins

1/4 cup white chocolate chips

1/4 cup unsweetened coconut flakes

1/2 cup almonds, slivered, roughly chopped or whatever

METHOD

  1. In your bread machine, add water, yeast and honey, followed by flours and salt. Run dough cycle. (If you’re doing this by hand, in a large bowl, mix together honey and 1/2 cup of the lukewarm water; then add the yeast, stirring to combine. Let sit until foaming, ca. 5 min. Stir in remaining 1 1/2 cups water. Then, in another large bowl, combine flours and salt and mix. Pour into bowl with liquid ingredients, stirring until well combined. On a floured surface, knead dough for 5 to 10 minutes or until smooth and elastic. Add flour if necessary, but be careful not to make the dough too dry. Place dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with a damp cloth and allow to proof for 1 1/2 hours.)
  2. Punch dough down, add remaining ingredients and run the dough cycle until you see that all bits are well combined, ca. 5 min. (Hand method: Punch dough down and turn out onto floured surface. Knead in remaining ingredients.)
  3. With a scoop or spatula, distribute dough evenly among muffin tins. (Hand method: Shape into 1 large loaf onto parchment paper-lined baking sheet.) Cover with a damp cloth and in a warm place, allow dough to proof until nearly doubled in size, ca. 30 min.
  4. Pre-heat oven to 425 F. Bake bread for 15 minutes. Then, reduce the temperature to 375 F and rotate bread 180 deg. Brush or spray the crust with water and, if making rolls, bake for another 15-20 minutes, or if making a loaf, bake for 30.
  5. Remove from the oven and place bread/rolls on a rack and allow to cool.