Tag Archives: brunch

Lemon Peach Scones

I made these ages ago. I’m sure I would have been able to write a quirky short story to accompany this recipe. Back then. Now, however, all I can do is keep things short and sweet and just post the dang recipe.

Before I do, let me just say two things:

1) The lemons: My former CEO let me raid the lemon tree in his “Babeland” backyard. (He’s German and according to him, there are a lot of babes in the Marina.) Serious huge lemons–the size of a small child’s head actually–and, surprisingly, they were not completely dry and flavorless. On the contrary, every gigantic pulp bit was bursting with juice.

2) The peaches: Handpicked from the Haight Street Farmer’s Market. It may have been a while ago, but I STILL remember just how gorgeous they were. And also huge–again, the size of a small child’s head.

This recipe I found on Always With Butter is awesome. Super simple. I picked it because it used A LOT of lemon. I also thought it would be able to handle the addition of my farmer’s market peaches.

Giant lemon + giant peach = epic combo for scones!

Oh, the original recipe included a glaze, but I skipped it. Too sticky. These are good just on their own. Hope you like them 🙂

Lemon Peach Scones (recipe adapted from Always With Butter)

INGREDIENTS

2 cups flour

1 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp baking soda

1/2 tsp salt

1/4 cup sugar

1/2 cup unsalted butter, cold and cubed

1/2 cup fresh lemon juice

2 tsp grated lemon zest (I used like 1 tbsp!)

1 large peach, cut into bite size chunks

METHOD

  1. Pre-heat oven at 350 F.
  2. Sift together baking powder, baking soda, salt and sugar.
  3. Cut in butter until it forms coarse crumbs.
  4. Mix in juice and grated zest.
  5. Quickly and gently fold in the peach chunks.
  6. Form into two disks and cut each into 4 pieces.
  7. Bake for 20-25 minutes. Let cool before serving

 

Shakshouka (Egg in Tomato Sauce)

Quick din-din for one: Shakshouka. Wikipedia says it’s Tunesian. Thinking about it now, though, maybe it’s more Tex-Mex? It’s almost like a low-carb Huevos Rancheros. I don’t know; I was hungry and threw together whatever was in the fridge. And this delicious, little dish was the result.

Enjoy!

Shakshouka – Tex Mex Style (Eggs in Tomato Sauce)

Recipe inspired by The Three Cheeses

printable recipe

Serves 1.

INGREDIENTS

small splash olive oil

1 clove garlic, roughly chopped

1/4 cup red onion, roughly chopped

1 leaf mustard greens

1/2 cup diced stewed tomatoes

1 egg

1/4 cup canned beans (I used pinto)

1/4 tsp dried oregano

1/4 tsp ground cumin

pinch of red chile flakes

salt and pepper to taste

grated cheese to top, optional (I used Jarlsberg, but any kind would work)

plain yogurt to top, optional

METHOD

  1. In a pre-heated (medium-high) small pan or saucepan, sauté onion, garlic and mustard greens in olive oil until slightly golden. Then add in tomatoes, cumin, oregano, salt and pepper. Stir and allow to simmer over low heat until liquid reduce somewhat, ca. 5 minutes.
  2. Stir in beans and crack an egg over the top. Cover and reduce heat further to lowest setting. Cook ca. 5 minutes. At about the half way point, sprinkle optional cheese over the top. Then cover, turn off the heat and allow to finish cooking and the cheese has completely melted. Be careful not to overcook the egg–the yolk should be sticky, golden and still a little runny. (If you like it cooked all the way through, cook it longer.)
  3. Top with plain yogurt and eat!

 

Bread: Whole Wheat or Half?

Can you tell the difference? I should’ve taken a closer shot of the first (whole wheat), but that aside, arrggg…night time pics. What a major pain in the blog! I’m still working out how to take good photos without having to set up some sort of makeshift studio. Maybe I’ll eventually be so good that I’ll be discovered by Food Network, and who will pay me just to bake and blog. THEN maybe I’d buy myself a monster DSLR and use artificial lighting.

A girl can dream, right?

And in the meantime, I’ll get back to the point of this post: bread, whole wheat or half-wheat/half-white to be exact. In Switzerland, you can buy “halbweissbrot”, which is I think 20-60% whole wheat flour and the rest, white. And then there’s “vollkornbrot”, which is basically all whole wheat. So I tried the recipe (from 4EveryKitchen), which is for a whole wheat french bread, twice. The first time, I followed the directions EXACTLY, but then ended up with a very dense loaf. The second time, however, I replaced half the whole wheat flour with all purpose and then replaced the bread machine yeast with active dry. And the result? Muuuuuch better. Perhaps my yeast was off the first try. Question: if I use all purpose flour, is extra gluten as called for in the original recipe really necessary? I don’t know—now that I think about it, perhaps not. Oh well, it worked all the same.

Because the halbweissbrot (half-white bread) is the one that turned out, I guess that’s the adapted recipe I’m going to post. Both loaves were tasty and full of hearty whole-wheat goodness, however, the half-white was just lighter and altogether prettier to look at. Again, it was probably a yeast issue, something I’ll have to investigate the next time I make this.

Btw, the directions are for the bread machine, but you can adjust to by hand or stand mixer, of course.

Enjoy!

Halbweissbrot / Half-White Bread (adapted from a recipe found on 4EveryKitchen)

printable recipe

Makes 1 loaf

INGREDIENTS

1 1/4 cups, plus 1 tbsp buttermilk (or 1 1/4 cups milk plus 1 tbsp lemon juice)

1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour

1 1/2 cups all purpose flour

1 tbsp gluten (optional?)

1 1/2 tsp salt

1 tbsp plus 1 tsp SAF instant yeast or 1 tbsp plus 2 tsp bread machine yeast (I actually used active dry)

METHOD

  1. Place all the ingredients IN ORDER into the bread machine. Select Dough setting and press start (ca. 1 hr 20 min).
  2. When the bread machine beeps at the end of the dough cycle, press STOP and unplug the machine. Open the lid and use your fingers to deflate the dough. Let the dough rise in the machine for another 30 minutes.
  3. Turn the dough onto a lightly floured work surface. This dough is very sticky, so when it’s ready to come out of the bread machine, just quickly tip it onto your prepared surface. Knead a few times and pat into a 12”x6” rectangle. Roll up from the long edge into a flat loaf and roll back and forth with your palms to make pointed ends. Fold the log of dough in half lengthwise and pinch seams to seal. Roll the dough back and forth again to make the loaf about 14” long. Cover gently with a damp dish towel and let rise at room temperature until doubled in bulk, ca. 1 hour.
  4. Twenty minutes before baking, place a baking stone on the center rack of a cold oven and preheat to 450 F/230 C, then reduce to 400/200 C. (4EveryKitchen suggests leaving the oven on for 20 minutes before lowering the heat to 400 F/200 C.) Place an EMPTY cake pan or broiler tray out of the way of your stone.
  5. Holding kitchen shears at 45 degree angle, snip the surface 5 or 6 times down the length of the loaf, cutting no more than 1” deep.
  6. Sprinkle a little flour directly on your pizza/baking stone. Using a dough scraper or steel spatula to help you, slide the loaf onto the prepared stone. Just before shutting the door add 1 cup hot tap water to the hot empty baking pan. This will steam the oven and make a very crispy crust. Bake for 30-35 minutes until the surface is dark brown and sounds hollow when you tap the top.
  7. Remove and let it cool on a rack.

Mmmm…Banana Bread

Nom nom nom. I made this ‘nana bread yesterday with a good friend of mine. We used to teach together, and just recently she became a mommy to the most gorgeous little boy. (He’s so funny; I’ve never met a baby so concerned about being clean!) So now whenever I go over to her place, she schools me on things like feeding schedules, bath time and “Mobys” (a cotton wrap baby carrier—Question: how do people not get tangled up in those things? They look so complicated!)

Anyway, S. had three really, really brown bananas and had asked me what to do with them. Naturally, I suggested banana bread—it’s easy, requires no special equipment or ingredients. I also have a stellar recipe, which I already wrote about in a previous post. I especially appreciate how flexible it is: you choose the kind of “fat”, the liquid, and whether to add nuts or not (No nuts this time). Then, blend wet ingredients and mix dry, combine and bake. How nice.

So, I went over there yesterday afternoon to show S. how to make it. And as we waited for it to bake, we sipped our chai, nibbled on brie and crackers and talked about all the big things happening in our lives right now—there’s A LOT going on. I think it did both our little hearts good—the baking and the talking. Ah, girlfriends. Sniff, sniff. 😛

Enjoy!

Recipe: Banana Bread

Cinnamon Raisin Rolls

Oh, man—what a day of distraction! And not because today just happens to be Halloween .I started the day so well, too: drove my sister to work at 7:30 AM (on a Sunday), went for a little jog around the university, showered and was ready to be productive by 9:30. But, somehow, in between writing cover letters and revising resumes, I decided my iTunes playlist needed updating and that my photos needed editing. Fast forward to 2 PM, and I was still futzing around with iTunes. Some people waste countless hours on Facebook; as for me, no longer a part of the FB Community (OMG, drama), all I am left to waste the hours away with are email and iTunes.

At least I baked. That should count for something.

Rolls again. But wait, these are actually pretty good! I did (instead of working) as I usually do when searching for a recipe: I went to Tastespotting and did a quick “bread” search. After a few minutes browsing and ogling all the gorgeous photos, I came across a recipe for Cinnamon Raisin Bread from A Chow Life. I stuck to the recipe, except, because I didn’t want to get my hands dirty, I let my bread machine do all the kneading. The directions described below, however, use the original hand-method. Another thing I changed is that I used almonds instead of walnuts and replaced 1 tbsp of butter with olive oil. (I didn’t want to cut into a second stick of butter.) Finally, as evidenced in the pictures, I made rolls, not a loaf.

I like this. The flavor is warm and spicy from all the butter and cinnamon. The color is also amazing—hello, gorgeous cinnamon speckles. And, the wonderful aroma of sugar and spice and everything nice that takes over the kitchen during baking is seriously in itself almost reason enough to make this.

Enjoy!

Cinnamon Raisin Rolls (slightly adapted from A Chow Life)

INGREDIENTS

1 pkg (or 2 1/4 tsp) active dry yeast

1/2 cup warm water

1/4 tsp, plus 3 tbsp sugar

2 1/2 cups all purpose flour

1/2 cup whole wheat flour

1 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

1/2 cup walnuts, toasted and chopped (I used almonds)

5 tbsp butter, melted and cooled to room temp. (I used 4 tbsp butter and 1 tbsp olive oil)

1/2 cup water

1 cup raisins

METHOD

  1. Stir the yeast, warm water, and 1/4 tsp sugar together in a small bowl. Let the mixture stand in a warm location until the yeast starts foaming, 5-10 minutes.
  2. Combine the flours, remaining sugar, cinnamon, salt, and walnuts in a large bowl. Stir well. Stir the yeast mixture, butter, and 1/3 cup water into the flour mixture. Then stir in the raisins or work them in by hand. Let stand 10 minutes.
  3. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface and knead by hand until it is smooth and elastic, about 7 minutes.
  4. Lightly oil a large bowl and turn the dough in it to coat it with the oil. Cover the bowl loosely with a kitchen town and let the dough rise in a warm location until it is doubled in bulk, 45 -60 minutes.
  5. Oil a 9 x 5 x 3 inch loaf pan. Punch the dough down and shape it into a loaf. Press the loaf into the prepared pan and, again, cover it loosely with a kitchen towel. Let it rise in a warm place until it nearly fills the pan, 45-60 minutes. (Or, if making rolls, I cut and rolled the dough into 13 pieces, placed them on a floured baking sheet, covered and let proof also for about 1 hour.)
  6. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Bake the bread until the top is browned and the bottom sounds hollow when tapped with your finger, 35-40 minutes. Remove from the pan and let cool on a rack. (In my case, before baking, I brushed the roll tops with water. Then, I baked for about 28 minutes.)

Look at those speckles! So pretty!

Coconut and Chocolate Pains au Lait

I’m sorry! It’s been ages since my last post! But I promise I have a good excuse—actually, I have a few: I moved in with my brother temporarily, I partied, I said my goodbye to San Francisco, I partied 😛 … and now I am home again. Back to the bird’s nest for 10 days of recharging my batteries and soaking up as much family love as I can before the big move to Perú. (Did I mention already that I’m moving? I can’t remember. Why? For love (when did my life become a cliché?), and I need to find out if it will finally find peace there. When? In 5 days!!)

Life in Oregon is slow—slow driving, slow moving, slow talking, slow everything. It’s taking some getting used to on my part, but it feels kind of good to have time to think and talk. And bake.

I’m so excited about this recipe. It’s one I found a while back on a beautiful blog called Sweet Temptations, and it couldn’t be easier to prepare. The dough is gorgeous—smooth and glossy—and the buns—soft, buttery and briochy. They’re also pretty tasty the next day, especially if you toast them.

The original recipe called for Nutella, which I probably would have used if I’d had it….but I didn’t. My mom had white and dark chocolate chips, flaked almonds and flaked coconut in her cupboard, so I used them instead. A variety of fillings and toppings would work just as well. Another small adjustment I made was to increase the sugar amount from 2 tbsp to 1/4 cup—wanted something a little sweeter for the family.

Enjoy!

Milk Bread with Coconut and Chocolate (recipe adapted from Sweet Temptations)

INGREDIENTS

320 ml (1 1/3 cups) milk

28 g (2 tbsp) unsalted butter, at room temp.

1/4 cup sugar

2 large eggs

2/3 tsp salt

540 g (5 cups) all-purpose flour

1 packet (11 g) instant dried yeast (or 4 1/4 tsp active dry)

chocolate chips – dark and white

almond flakes (optional)

brown sugar (optional)

coconut flakes (optional)

METHOD

  1. Beat the eggs, and then whisk in the butter, sugar and milk.
  2. In your stand-mixer, mix together flour, yeast and salt. Make a well in the center. Add 1/3 of the egg mixture and allow to knead (using dough hook attachment) until somewhat combined. Then add the rest of the liquids and knead for another 10 minutes on medium speed.
  3. Put the dough into a large bowl dusted with flour and allow to proof for about an hour until the dough has doubled in size.
  4. Once the dough has proofed, form small balls in your hand and flatten lightly. Add about a tablespoon of chocolate chips and almond flakes in the middle and seal. Continue the process until all the dough has been used. Let the little dough balls rise on a baking sheet for another 45 minutes.
  5. Brush the beaten egg over the pains and then sprinkle some brown sugar and/or coconut flakes over the tops. Put the buns on the middle rack of a pre-heated oven (350 deg. F) and bake for 20 minutes. After the first 10 minutes, you may want to rotate the buns to ensure even baking and browning.

For the Love of Carbs Bread Pudding

What a simple yet completely brilliant idea bread pudding is. How often do I bake bread? Weekly. And how often do I end up with stale leftovers which I have to throw away? Um…always. (-_-“) Oh, for the love of carbs…

This is another dessert I had never tried until now. Probably because in my head when I think “bread pudding” I think of a tuna sandwich (my favorite), but in pudding form. Kinda gross to imagine it, actually. Also, when I see it on a menu, there always seems to be something better…like tiramisu (oh…) or cheesecake (oooooh…) to eat. Since trying it, however, I’ve decided I’ve been quite unfair to this homely, little dessert. It’s sweet, carby, warm and comforting—perfect snuggle-on-the-sofa-in-your-snuggy dessert, that’s what it is. (Does this snuggy reference mean I have to get one now? :P)

I can’t say I’d choose bread pudding over a big, fat slice of creamy NY cheesecake. Still, I’m glad to have it on my dessert radar. Oh, and now that I’m no longer afraid of bread pudding, I can’t wait to experiment with both sweet and savory versions…oooooh, like a savory tuna version, i.e. breakfast strata or tuna noodle bread casserole, sounds reallly tasty! (^_^)

Enjoy!

Whole Wheat Bread Pudding (adapted from a recipe from A Homemaker’s Habitat)

Makes one 8-inch springform cake tin

INGREDIENTS

1/2 loaf whole wheat bread (mine had cranberries and sunflower seeds in it), preferably stale

1 cup milk (I used non-fat)

1 cup heavy cream

1/4 cup (2 oz) unsalted butter, melted and cooled

1 1/2 eggs, beaten lightly (I used 1 jumbo, and I’m sure 2 large would’ve been fine too)

1 tsp vanilla extract

1/2 tsp cinnamon

1/4 tsp ground nutmeg

3/4 cup brown sugar, packed firmly

METHOD

  1. In a medium-sized mixing bowl, tear the bread up into bite-sized pieces. Set aside.
  2. In another medium-sized mixing bowl, whisk together milk, cream, butter and eggs, followed by the cinnamon, ground nutmeg and brown sugar until combined.
  3. Stir the custard mixture into the bowl with the bread until thoroughly combined. Cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes.
  4. Pre-heat the oven to 350 F, with the baking rack in the center.
  5. Into a greased 8-inch springform cake tin or small cake pan, pour the bread-custard mixture. Bake 1 hour, or until golden and puffy on top. (According to the original recipe, the pudding should “wiggle slightly” when shaken.)
  6. Allow to cool for 5 or so minutes before slicing/serving. You can also serve it at room temperature or cold with a fruit sauce, custard (yum…), ice cream or whipped cream.

Raisin Walnut Bread

I’m addicted to carbs in the worst way. Seriously, I don’t think I could get through the day without having at least one piece of bread. Despite being completely aware of the consequences related to having “too much of a good thing”, however, I just can’t help myself. Why do carbs have to taste. so. gooooood???

It’s really all Switzerland’s fault. I spent too many years there and ate too much good, fresh bread—sometimes slathered with jam and butter, ripe gruyere and butter, or just butter. I even learned to enjoy it just on its own. With maybe a cup of good coffee that I can use for dunking (I even dunk bagels—strange? Perhaps…)

So what’s my point? What I’m trying to say is…why fight it? I chose indulgence, but in moderation, like by integrating more healthy starches and fibers and organic and unbleached carbs into my diet? I think I can do that 😛

This recipe is the first of my new commitment to baking my own bread every week. It’s a raisin walnut bread adapted from a cranberry walnut bread recipe I found on Passionate about Baking. And I’ve been snacking on it all week long. Its sweet, has a hardy, whole wheat texture and flavor, which is lightened up by the dried fruit and orange juice, and it keeps really well. (Made it Sunday and it is now Thursday—last day, though). I switched out the cranberries for raisins and buckwheat flour for barley to no ill-effect. I think a variety of fruit-nut mixtures would work; besides, it’s always nice to be able to make something with just what you have at home.

Now that I’ll be doing a lot of bread-baking—like every week—I’m sure I’ll be making this one again. I want to try fresh fruit…will that work? Only one way to find out 🙂

Btw, if you’re interested in something lighter and sweeter, I’ve also made a Cinnamon-Raisin Swirl Loaf. Read about it here.

Enjoy!

Raisin Walnut Bread (original recipe adapted from Passionate about Baking)

INGREDIENTS

160 ml lukewarm water

1 1/2 tsp active dried yeast

1 tbsp olive oil

40 ml fresh orange juice (about 1 orange)

200 g all purpose flour

50 g whole wheat flour

65 g barley flour

1 tsp salt

50 g raisins or dried cranberries

50 g walnuts, roughly broken up into pieces

oil, for greasing

METHOD

  1. In a small mixing bowl, put the yeast into the warm water and let stand for 10 minutes, then add the orange juice, olive oil and salt. Stir to combine.
  2. In large mixing bowl, combine the flours. Make a well in the center of the mixture and pour in the prepared liquids. With a fork, gradually bring the flour into the liquid to combine. When a dough starts to form, start kneading. Knead for 8-10 minutes until you’re left with a smooth and silky dough, adding a little more water if required. Knead in the cranberries and walnuts. Put into an oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap and leave in a warm place to double.
  3. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface (Tip: Use your Silpat—it helps against sticking and makes shaping easier). Trying not to beat too much risen air out, pull the edges so that they all met in the center to form a puffed round cushion shape. Using a long object, divide the dough into 2 equal halves (don’t cut; just make an indentation).Press down a little and fold one half over the other. Crimp the edges with your fingers as you would an empanada or Cornish pastry. Roll the dough-log onto a floured surface to create a torpedo like baguette shape. Lay it gently on a flour-dusted Silpat (I know you don’t have to do this, but I did anyway…just in case), cover loosely with plastic wrap, and leave to rise in a warm place for another 45 minutes.
  4. Heat the oven to 220 C (425 F), placing a pan of boiling water on the bottom rack. Roll the bread off the Silpat onto a baking sheet—gently so as not to lose air. Use a sharp serated knife to give it 3 diagonal slashes, 1 cm deep.
  5. Bake for 20-25 minutes, till the bottom sounds hollow when tapped. (My loaf needed 35). Leave to cool on a wire rack before slicing.

Applesauce Bread

It seems like all I ever bake is quickbread and poundcake. I would much rather be baking tarts filled with pastry cream and berries or flourless chocolate tortes, but they’re actually not very popular at work.  I’m starting to think that people like and even prefer simple. I mean, there’s a reason why there are nearly one thousand entries on Tastespotting for brownies and 500 for chocolate chip cookies alone. They’re classic, homey and, for many people, have sentimental meaning associated with them.

This recipe from Applesauce Bread is exactly that: warm, homey and filled with nostalgia. I didn’t grow up eating this and don’t have a heartwarming antidote to tell. But if I did, I would want it to be about this bread.

I tweaked the original recipe from Back to the Cutting Board ever so slightly by adding a few tablespoons of ground flaxseed, a banana and a handful of raisins. In hindsight, I wish I would’ve left the banana out, as it’s aroma takes away from that of the applesauce. The raisins, however, were definitely a wise addition. They plump up during baking and are a pleasant little burst of flavor in each bite.

The cake comes out pretty dense and moist—as the best kind do. This is probably due to the addition of the banana and raisins.

Enjoy 😛

Applesauce Bread (original recipe adapted from Back to the Cutting Board)

INGREDIENTS

1/2 cup (1 stick) butter or margarine, at room temp.

1 cup sugar

2 eggs

1 3/4 cups flour

1 tsp salt

1 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp baking soda

1/2 tsp cinnamon

1/2 tsp nutmeg

2 tbsp ground flaxseed

1 cup unsweetened applesauce

1 ripe banana

1/2 cup raisins

METHOD

  1. Preheat oven to 350 F.  Grease a standard 9×6×3-inch loaf pan.
  2. In a large bowl gradually add sugar into butter, cream until light.  Add eggs and beat until light and fluffy.
  3. In a separate bowl combine all the dry ingredients, except the banana and raisins.
  4. Combine half the dry mixture with the butter mixture.  Then add in 1/2  cup of applesauce and combine.  Repeat with remaining dry mixture and 1/2 cup of applesauce, mixing after each.
  5. With a spatula or wooden spoon, stir in the sliced banana and raisins.
  6. Pour batter into pan.  Bake for about 1 hour.  It’ll be a nice golden brown and a toothpick will come out clean.  Cool 10 minutes and remove from pan. Let cool to room temperature before serving.

Roasted Tomato, Basil and Goat Cheese Tart

Took this pic w/ my cell. I swear I have THE WORST camera karma. I forgot my camera charger--again! Will have it back this weekend, though (Thx, Guapo!)

I’m so excited to write today. It’s one of those dreamy Sunday afternoons here in the city. Sun, a cloudless sky and quiet on the street below. The cherry blossoms have also started budding and blooming right outside my apartment window. It is a day to be spent out of doors, which is exactly what I’ll be doing when I go on a walking tour of Victorian San Francisco.

But before I could do anything, I had to make this tart.

It is the kind of tart that comforts my little heart and puts all thoughts to rest. I simply read through the instructions and let my hands do the work. No over-thinking, no stressing. Just baking.

We had beautiful organic tomatoes and basil left over from Melita’s dinner party last week. It would have been a shame to let them just sit there. So I rescued them. I came across this Roasted Red Pepper and Goat Cheese Tart on Lisa is Cooking a few months ago, which in a google search led me to Nick Malgieri’s recipe. The dough is olive oil based, which intrigued me. And the ingredients list for the filling is short—and also very flexible—which is even more interesting. Each ingredient’s flavor will be distinct and intense in its own way. Also, you can completely change the character of the tart by using a different cheese and/or roasted veggies.

I hope you enjoy this tart as much as I did. Happy Superbowl Sunday!

Roasted Tomato and Goat Cheese Tart (adapted from Nick Malgierie’s The Modern Baker)

Makes one 10 to 11-inch tart

Olive Oil Dough

1 1/2 cups all purpose flour

1/2 tsp sugar

1/2 tsp salt

1/2 tsp baking powder

1/4 cup olive oil

1 large egg

1 large egg yolk

2-3 tbsp water

Roasted Tomatoes

4 large tomatoes, cut into eighths

4 cloves garlic, unpeeled

olive oil

salt and pepper

Tart Filling & Egg Mixture

10 oz mild goat cheese, crumbled

1 large handful basil, cut into thin strips

6 large eggs

salt and pepper

METHOD

Roasted Tomatoes

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 375 F. Place the prepped tomatoes and garlic cloves onto a baking tray. Drizzle olive oil on top and then sprinkle over the salt and pepper. Bake for 50-60 minutes.
  2. Transfer the tomatoes to a small bowl and allow to cool completely. Discard the garlic (I suppose you could use it if you like).

Dough

  1. Combine the flour, sugar, salt and baking powder in the bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade. Pulse several times to mix. (I did this sans food processor.)
  2. Add the oil, egg, egg yolk and water. Pulse repeatedly until the dough forms a shaggy ball. Don’t over-mix or the oil might separate out of the dough and make it impossible to handle later on. If the dough seems dry and not about to form a ball, add water a 1/2 tsp at a time until it does. (I also did this all by hand. I made a well in the flour, whisked together the egg, egg yolk, oil and water in the well and then with a fork gradually mixed the liquids and flour mixture together.)
  3. Invert the dough onto a floured surface. Press the dough into a disk without folding it over on itself. Wrap and chill for up to 3 days.

For the Tart

  1. When you are ready to bake the tart, set a baking rack in the lowest level of the oven and pre-heat to 375 F.
  2. Roll the dough on a floured surface and then line your tart pan with it, trimming away the excess dough at the top rim. (I don’t like adding even more flour to the dough—it makes a mess and also changes the dough. Instead, I roll the dough out between 2 pieces of plastic wrap. No mess, no sticking and an easy transfer from counter to tart pan.)
  3. Sprinkle the tart crust with the goat cheese. Cover the cheese with the roasted tomatoes, slightly overlapping, followed by the basil.
  4. Whisk the eggs with the salt (not too much; the cheese is salty enough) and pepper. Pour the mixture into the tart crust to uniformly cover the tomatoes.
  5. Bake the tart until the filling is set and well colored and the crust is baked through, ca. 30 minutes. (Mine needed 35 min.) Then cool on a rack. Serve at room temperature.