Tag Archives: breakfast

Kale Banana Milkshake

My eye doctor recently told me kale is the new superfood. It’s good for my eyes and I’m thinking it’s good for basically everything else–my hair, my skin, weight control, etc. I recently developed this arm/hand thing (not carpal, ulnal–the nerve that runs through the ring and pinky finger) which I am hoping will improve also.

I’ve been eating kale in salad, in omelets, in quesadillas and as of this morning in my morning smoothie. So that may seem a bit odd, but it’s actually pretty good. And it makes me feel like I started my day off right–and that I’m loving and caring for this not-getting-any-younger physical vehicle of mine.

The kale flavor and bits lend a fresh, green taste and isn’t bitter at all. Besides that, you know that anything with banana and milk is going to be tasty. I tossed in some frozen cantaloupe I had as well, but it’s totally optional and also easily substituted with other fruits.

Enjoy! (Oh and if you know of any interesting kale recipes, pass them my way 🙂 )


 

Kale Banana Milkshake (inspired by For the Love of Food)

INGREDIENTS

1/2 cup milk

1/2 cup water

1 big leaf kale, without stem and rinsed well

1 banana

1/4 cup cantaloupe, cubed (You can leave this out or replace it with any other kind of fruit.)

1 tbsp honey

METHOD

  1. Put everything into the blender and mix until smooth.

Lemon Peach Scones

I made these ages ago. I’m sure I would have been able to write a quirky short story to accompany this recipe. Back then. Now, however, all I can do is keep things short and sweet and just post the dang recipe.

Before I do, let me just say two things:

1) The lemons: My former CEO let me raid the lemon tree in his “Babeland” backyard. (He’s German and according to him, there are a lot of babes in the Marina.) Serious huge lemons–the size of a small child’s head actually–and, surprisingly, they were not completely dry and flavorless. On the contrary, every gigantic pulp bit was bursting with juice.

2) The peaches: Handpicked from the Haight Street Farmer’s Market. It may have been a while ago, but I STILL remember just how gorgeous they were. And also huge–again, the size of a small child’s head.

This recipe I found on Always With Butter is awesome. Super simple. I picked it because it used A LOT of lemon. I also thought it would be able to handle the addition of my farmer’s market peaches.

Giant lemon + giant peach = epic combo for scones!

Oh, the original recipe included a glaze, but I skipped it. Too sticky. These are good just on their own. Hope you like them 🙂

Lemon Peach Scones (recipe adapted from Always With Butter)

INGREDIENTS

2 cups flour

1 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp baking soda

1/2 tsp salt

1/4 cup sugar

1/2 cup unsalted butter, cold and cubed

1/2 cup fresh lemon juice

2 tsp grated lemon zest (I used like 1 tbsp!)

1 large peach, cut into bite size chunks

METHOD

  1. Pre-heat oven at 350 F.
  2. Sift together baking powder, baking soda, salt and sugar.
  3. Cut in butter until it forms coarse crumbs.
  4. Mix in juice and grated zest.
  5. Quickly and gently fold in the peach chunks.
  6. Form into two disks and cut each into 4 pieces.
  7. Bake for 20-25 minutes. Let cool before serving

 

Shakshouka (Egg in Tomato Sauce)

Quick din-din for one: Shakshouka. Wikipedia says it’s Tunesian. Thinking about it now, though, maybe it’s more Tex-Mex? It’s almost like a low-carb Huevos Rancheros. I don’t know; I was hungry and threw together whatever was in the fridge. And this delicious, little dish was the result.

Enjoy!

Shakshouka – Tex Mex Style (Eggs in Tomato Sauce)

Recipe inspired by The Three Cheeses

printable recipe

Serves 1.

INGREDIENTS

small splash olive oil

1 clove garlic, roughly chopped

1/4 cup red onion, roughly chopped

1 leaf mustard greens

1/2 cup diced stewed tomatoes

1 egg

1/4 cup canned beans (I used pinto)

1/4 tsp dried oregano

1/4 tsp ground cumin

pinch of red chile flakes

salt and pepper to taste

grated cheese to top, optional (I used Jarlsberg, but any kind would work)

plain yogurt to top, optional

METHOD

  1. In a pre-heated (medium-high) small pan or saucepan, sauté onion, garlic and mustard greens in olive oil until slightly golden. Then add in tomatoes, cumin, oregano, salt and pepper. Stir and allow to simmer over low heat until liquid reduce somewhat, ca. 5 minutes.
  2. Stir in beans and crack an egg over the top. Cover and reduce heat further to lowest setting. Cook ca. 5 minutes. At about the half way point, sprinkle optional cheese over the top. Then cover, turn off the heat and allow to finish cooking and the cheese has completely melted. Be careful not to overcook the egg–the yolk should be sticky, golden and still a little runny. (If you like it cooked all the way through, cook it longer.)
  3. Top with plain yogurt and eat!

 

Bread: Whole Wheat or Half?

Can you tell the difference? I should’ve taken a closer shot of the first (whole wheat), but that aside, arrggg…night time pics. What a major pain in the blog! I’m still working out how to take good photos without having to set up some sort of makeshift studio. Maybe I’ll eventually be so good that I’ll be discovered by Food Network, and who will pay me just to bake and blog. THEN maybe I’d buy myself a monster DSLR and use artificial lighting.

A girl can dream, right?

And in the meantime, I’ll get back to the point of this post: bread, whole wheat or half-wheat/half-white to be exact. In Switzerland, you can buy “halbweissbrot”, which is I think 20-60% whole wheat flour and the rest, white. And then there’s “vollkornbrot”, which is basically all whole wheat. So I tried the recipe (from 4EveryKitchen), which is for a whole wheat french bread, twice. The first time, I followed the directions EXACTLY, but then ended up with a very dense loaf. The second time, however, I replaced half the whole wheat flour with all purpose and then replaced the bread machine yeast with active dry. And the result? Muuuuuch better. Perhaps my yeast was off the first try. Question: if I use all purpose flour, is extra gluten as called for in the original recipe really necessary? I don’t know—now that I think about it, perhaps not. Oh well, it worked all the same.

Because the halbweissbrot (half-white bread) is the one that turned out, I guess that’s the adapted recipe I’m going to post. Both loaves were tasty and full of hearty whole-wheat goodness, however, the half-white was just lighter and altogether prettier to look at. Again, it was probably a yeast issue, something I’ll have to investigate the next time I make this.

Btw, the directions are for the bread machine, but you can adjust to by hand or stand mixer, of course.

Enjoy!

Halbweissbrot / Half-White Bread (adapted from a recipe found on 4EveryKitchen)

printable recipe

Makes 1 loaf

INGREDIENTS

1 1/4 cups, plus 1 tbsp buttermilk (or 1 1/4 cups milk plus 1 tbsp lemon juice)

1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour

1 1/2 cups all purpose flour

1 tbsp gluten (optional?)

1 1/2 tsp salt

1 tbsp plus 1 tsp SAF instant yeast or 1 tbsp plus 2 tsp bread machine yeast (I actually used active dry)

METHOD

  1. Place all the ingredients IN ORDER into the bread machine. Select Dough setting and press start (ca. 1 hr 20 min).
  2. When the bread machine beeps at the end of the dough cycle, press STOP and unplug the machine. Open the lid and use your fingers to deflate the dough. Let the dough rise in the machine for another 30 minutes.
  3. Turn the dough onto a lightly floured work surface. This dough is very sticky, so when it’s ready to come out of the bread machine, just quickly tip it onto your prepared surface. Knead a few times and pat into a 12”x6” rectangle. Roll up from the long edge into a flat loaf and roll back and forth with your palms to make pointed ends. Fold the log of dough in half lengthwise and pinch seams to seal. Roll the dough back and forth again to make the loaf about 14” long. Cover gently with a damp dish towel and let rise at room temperature until doubled in bulk, ca. 1 hour.
  4. Twenty minutes before baking, place a baking stone on the center rack of a cold oven and preheat to 450 F/230 C, then reduce to 400/200 C. (4EveryKitchen suggests leaving the oven on for 20 minutes before lowering the heat to 400 F/200 C.) Place an EMPTY cake pan or broiler tray out of the way of your stone.
  5. Holding kitchen shears at 45 degree angle, snip the surface 5 or 6 times down the length of the loaf, cutting no more than 1” deep.
  6. Sprinkle a little flour directly on your pizza/baking stone. Using a dough scraper or steel spatula to help you, slide the loaf onto the prepared stone. Just before shutting the door add 1 cup hot tap water to the hot empty baking pan. This will steam the oven and make a very crispy crust. Bake for 30-35 minutes until the surface is dark brown and sounds hollow when you tap the top.
  7. Remove and let it cool on a rack.

Cinnamon Raisin Rolls

Oh, man—what a day of distraction! And not because today just happens to be Halloween .I started the day so well, too: drove my sister to work at 7:30 AM (on a Sunday), went for a little jog around the university, showered and was ready to be productive by 9:30. But, somehow, in between writing cover letters and revising resumes, I decided my iTunes playlist needed updating and that my photos needed editing. Fast forward to 2 PM, and I was still futzing around with iTunes. Some people waste countless hours on Facebook; as for me, no longer a part of the FB Community (OMG, drama), all I am left to waste the hours away with are email and iTunes.

At least I baked. That should count for something.

Rolls again. But wait, these are actually pretty good! I did (instead of working) as I usually do when searching for a recipe: I went to Tastespotting and did a quick “bread” search. After a few minutes browsing and ogling all the gorgeous photos, I came across a recipe for Cinnamon Raisin Bread from A Chow Life. I stuck to the recipe, except, because I didn’t want to get my hands dirty, I let my bread machine do all the kneading. The directions described below, however, use the original hand-method. Another thing I changed is that I used almonds instead of walnuts and replaced 1 tbsp of butter with olive oil. (I didn’t want to cut into a second stick of butter.) Finally, as evidenced in the pictures, I made rolls, not a loaf.

I like this. The flavor is warm and spicy from all the butter and cinnamon. The color is also amazing—hello, gorgeous cinnamon speckles. And, the wonderful aroma of sugar and spice and everything nice that takes over the kitchen during baking is seriously in itself almost reason enough to make this.

Enjoy!

Cinnamon Raisin Rolls (slightly adapted from A Chow Life)

INGREDIENTS

1 pkg (or 2 1/4 tsp) active dry yeast

1/2 cup warm water

1/4 tsp, plus 3 tbsp sugar

2 1/2 cups all purpose flour

1/2 cup whole wheat flour

1 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

1/2 cup walnuts, toasted and chopped (I used almonds)

5 tbsp butter, melted and cooled to room temp. (I used 4 tbsp butter and 1 tbsp olive oil)

1/2 cup water

1 cup raisins

METHOD

  1. Stir the yeast, warm water, and 1/4 tsp sugar together in a small bowl. Let the mixture stand in a warm location until the yeast starts foaming, 5-10 minutes.
  2. Combine the flours, remaining sugar, cinnamon, salt, and walnuts in a large bowl. Stir well. Stir the yeast mixture, butter, and 1/3 cup water into the flour mixture. Then stir in the raisins or work them in by hand. Let stand 10 minutes.
  3. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface and knead by hand until it is smooth and elastic, about 7 minutes.
  4. Lightly oil a large bowl and turn the dough in it to coat it with the oil. Cover the bowl loosely with a kitchen town and let the dough rise in a warm location until it is doubled in bulk, 45 -60 minutes.
  5. Oil a 9 x 5 x 3 inch loaf pan. Punch the dough down and shape it into a loaf. Press the loaf into the prepared pan and, again, cover it loosely with a kitchen towel. Let it rise in a warm place until it nearly fills the pan, 45-60 minutes. (Or, if making rolls, I cut and rolled the dough into 13 pieces, placed them on a floured baking sheet, covered and let proof also for about 1 hour.)
  6. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Bake the bread until the top is browned and the bottom sounds hollow when tapped with your finger, 35-40 minutes. Remove from the pan and let cool on a rack. (In my case, before baking, I brushed the roll tops with water. Then, I baked for about 28 minutes.)

Look at those speckles! So pretty!

Whole Wheat Breakfast Rolls

Just a quick post for these rolls I made for the students yesterday 😛 The recipe is from CookingBread.com. I like it: the bread, which I made into individual rolls, is tender, tears nicely and has a pleasantly warm flavoring due to the addition of milk, butter and olive oil to the dough. (They also keep longer this way, I think.) I took the liberty of adding a few diced prunes to the mix to cut through and compliment the richness of the dough. I made 16 average-sized rolls, but you can make more or less by changing the size.

Enjoy!

Whole Wheat Breakfast Rolls (adapted from CookingBread.com)

INGREDIENTS

1 3/4 cup lukewarm milk

1/4 cup unsalted butter, melted

3 tbsp olive oil

1/4 cup runny honey

1 large egg, beaten

4 tsp instant yeast

4 cups whole wheat flour

1 cup all purpose flour

2 tsp salt

1/2 cup prunes, diced (optional)

METHOD

  1. Heat milk to lukewarm. Pour into a bowl add melted butter, olive oil, honey and beaten egg; mix all together until well blended. If using a bread machine, pour in now.
  2. In another bowl, combine flour, salt and yeast; mix together and knead until smooth and elastic. Place dough into a lightly oiled bowl, cover and let proof for about 1 1/2 hours or till doubled in bulk. If using bread machine, add in dry ingredients and run dough cycle.
  3. Once proofed, pour out dough onto a flat surface and knead for a minute or two. If adding diced prunes, knead them in now.
  4. Cut dough in half and shape into loaves. Place into two greased 4.5×8.5 loaf pans. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to double in size. Or, you can do what I did, which is to form the dough into small rolls and place them side by side on a lightly floured baking sheet.
  5. Bake in a pre-heated 350 F oven for 30-35 minutes if baking loaves or 25-28 minutes if baking rolls, or until golden and sounds hollow when tapped on the bottom. Remove from pans and cool on a wire rack. (I baked my rolls at 360 F for 26 minutes because my parents’ oven tends to under-heat.)

Trail Mix Bread

I’m housesitting for my parents right now. Part of my official housesitter duties includes taking care of the three exchange students my parents have living with them. It could have been a lot of work, but luckily, these kids (almost adults) are superstar students who need very little care from me. All I do is prepare two meals a day, breakfast and dinner. I actually kind of like doing it. I get up every morning to make breakfast, chat with them about school and their plans, and then during the day, I do my own thing. In the evening, I prepare whatever I feel like making, and so far, they’ve seemed pretty satisfied!

Today, I felt like baking bread. Outside is gray and quiet, which is not very motivating for getting things done. Baking—and baking for others—I’ve found is the best way to spend still days like these. The kids will appreciate it too, i.e. breakfast rolls!

I threw together this whole wheat bread with a delightful little mix of raisins, almonds, white chocolate chips and coconut flakes. Perfect for breakfast, and now that I think of it, ideal for taking along on a hike. It’s trail mix in bread form!  The recipe is one I found a while back on zestycook.com and is already a favorite because of the short ingredients list and simple method. I didn’t feel like futzing around with scales or complicated dough starters, so this recipe is exactly what I needed. The original used 2/3 cup each of raisins and walnuts; I skipped the walnuts and added white chocolate chips, coconut flakes and almonds in their place; I was also a little more generous in the amounts of each. (Why? Because those little “bits” you find in your morning bread are the best part!!)

Once you mix everything together and finish proofing (which I did in the bread machine), you can form the dough into the traditional loaf or you can do as I did and use your muffin tin. I was nervous about the bread sticking (the dough, at least mine, is pretty wet), but because I floured the tin before filling, sticking was very minimal. I thought this was a pretty genius idea on my part—scoop the dough into the tins and allow to finish proofing and bypass the messy, sticky part of shaping and moving the dough. Nice!

Golden, crunchy crust and sweet middle with lots of bits!! I WILL be making this again. Probably this week!

P.S. No pictures for now. I had a little theft incident in Lima (too scary to write about), which left me camera-less and also a little traumatized. This last week I ordered a new camera, which is supposed to arrive this week…

It’s here—my camera—and it’s pink!! Took a few pics of the last of the bread, and actually, it sttill tastes pretty good 🙂

Trail Mix Bread

recipe adapted from zestycook.com

INGREDIENTS

2 cups lukewarm water

2 1/4 tsp active dry yeast (or one 1/4-oz. packet)

2 tbsp runny honey (I used clover)

2 3/4 cup whole wheat flour

1 1/2 to 2 cups all purpose flour (I used 1 1/2, which is why my dough was wetter, but which turned out fine.)

2/ tsp salt

1/2 cup raisins

1/4 cup white chocolate chips

1/4 cup unsweetened coconut flakes

1/2 cup almonds, slivered, roughly chopped or whatever

METHOD

  1. In your bread machine, add water, yeast and honey, followed by flours and salt. Run dough cycle. (If you’re doing this by hand, in a large bowl, mix together honey and 1/2 cup of the lukewarm water; then add the yeast, stirring to combine. Let sit until foaming, ca. 5 min. Stir in remaining 1 1/2 cups water. Then, in another large bowl, combine flours and salt and mix. Pour into bowl with liquid ingredients, stirring until well combined. On a floured surface, knead dough for 5 to 10 minutes or until smooth and elastic. Add flour if necessary, but be careful not to make the dough too dry. Place dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with a damp cloth and allow to proof for 1 1/2 hours.)
  2. Punch dough down, add remaining ingredients and run the dough cycle until you see that all bits are well combined, ca. 5 min. (Hand method: Punch dough down and turn out onto floured surface. Knead in remaining ingredients.)
  3. With a scoop or spatula, distribute dough evenly among muffin tins. (Hand method: Shape into 1 large loaf onto parchment paper-lined baking sheet.) Cover with a damp cloth and in a warm place, allow dough to proof until nearly doubled in size, ca. 30 min.
  4. Pre-heat oven to 425 F. Bake bread for 15 minutes. Then, reduce the temperature to 375 F and rotate bread 180 deg. Brush or spray the crust with water and, if making rolls, bake for another 15-20 minutes, or if making a loaf, bake for 30.
  5. Remove from the oven and place bread/rolls on a rack and allow to cool.

Coconut and Chocolate Pains au Lait

I’m sorry! It’s been ages since my last post! But I promise I have a good excuse—actually, I have a few: I moved in with my brother temporarily, I partied, I said my goodbye to San Francisco, I partied 😛 … and now I am home again. Back to the bird’s nest for 10 days of recharging my batteries and soaking up as much family love as I can before the big move to Perú. (Did I mention already that I’m moving? I can’t remember. Why? For love (when did my life become a cliché?), and I need to find out if it will finally find peace there. When? In 5 days!!)

Life in Oregon is slow—slow driving, slow moving, slow talking, slow everything. It’s taking some getting used to on my part, but it feels kind of good to have time to think and talk. And bake.

I’m so excited about this recipe. It’s one I found a while back on a beautiful blog called Sweet Temptations, and it couldn’t be easier to prepare. The dough is gorgeous—smooth and glossy—and the buns—soft, buttery and briochy. They’re also pretty tasty the next day, especially if you toast them.

The original recipe called for Nutella, which I probably would have used if I’d had it….but I didn’t. My mom had white and dark chocolate chips, flaked almonds and flaked coconut in her cupboard, so I used them instead. A variety of fillings and toppings would work just as well. Another small adjustment I made was to increase the sugar amount from 2 tbsp to 1/4 cup—wanted something a little sweeter for the family.

Enjoy!

Milk Bread with Coconut and Chocolate (recipe adapted from Sweet Temptations)

INGREDIENTS

320 ml (1 1/3 cups) milk

28 g (2 tbsp) unsalted butter, at room temp.

1/4 cup sugar

2 large eggs

2/3 tsp salt

540 g (5 cups) all-purpose flour

1 packet (11 g) instant dried yeast (or 4 1/4 tsp active dry)

chocolate chips – dark and white

almond flakes (optional)

brown sugar (optional)

coconut flakes (optional)

METHOD

  1. Beat the eggs, and then whisk in the butter, sugar and milk.
  2. In your stand-mixer, mix together flour, yeast and salt. Make a well in the center. Add 1/3 of the egg mixture and allow to knead (using dough hook attachment) until somewhat combined. Then add the rest of the liquids and knead for another 10 minutes on medium speed.
  3. Put the dough into a large bowl dusted with flour and allow to proof for about an hour until the dough has doubled in size.
  4. Once the dough has proofed, form small balls in your hand and flatten lightly. Add about a tablespoon of chocolate chips and almond flakes in the middle and seal. Continue the process until all the dough has been used. Let the little dough balls rise on a baking sheet for another 45 minutes.
  5. Brush the beaten egg over the pains and then sprinkle some brown sugar and/or coconut flakes over the tops. Put the buns on the middle rack of a pre-heated oven (350 deg. F) and bake for 20 minutes. After the first 10 minutes, you may want to rotate the buns to ensure even baking and browning.

For the Love of Carbs Bread Pudding

What a simple yet completely brilliant idea bread pudding is. How often do I bake bread? Weekly. And how often do I end up with stale leftovers which I have to throw away? Um…always. (-_-“) Oh, for the love of carbs…

This is another dessert I had never tried until now. Probably because in my head when I think “bread pudding” I think of a tuna sandwich (my favorite), but in pudding form. Kinda gross to imagine it, actually. Also, when I see it on a menu, there always seems to be something better…like tiramisu (oh…) or cheesecake (oooooh…) to eat. Since trying it, however, I’ve decided I’ve been quite unfair to this homely, little dessert. It’s sweet, carby, warm and comforting—perfect snuggle-on-the-sofa-in-your-snuggy dessert, that’s what it is. (Does this snuggy reference mean I have to get one now? :P)

I can’t say I’d choose bread pudding over a big, fat slice of creamy NY cheesecake. Still, I’m glad to have it on my dessert radar. Oh, and now that I’m no longer afraid of bread pudding, I can’t wait to experiment with both sweet and savory versions…oooooh, like a savory tuna version, i.e. breakfast strata or tuna noodle bread casserole, sounds reallly tasty! (^_^)

Enjoy!

Whole Wheat Bread Pudding (adapted from a recipe from A Homemaker’s Habitat)

Makes one 8-inch springform cake tin

INGREDIENTS

1/2 loaf whole wheat bread (mine had cranberries and sunflower seeds in it), preferably stale

1 cup milk (I used non-fat)

1 cup heavy cream

1/4 cup (2 oz) unsalted butter, melted and cooled

1 1/2 eggs, beaten lightly (I used 1 jumbo, and I’m sure 2 large would’ve been fine too)

1 tsp vanilla extract

1/2 tsp cinnamon

1/4 tsp ground nutmeg

3/4 cup brown sugar, packed firmly

METHOD

  1. In a medium-sized mixing bowl, tear the bread up into bite-sized pieces. Set aside.
  2. In another medium-sized mixing bowl, whisk together milk, cream, butter and eggs, followed by the cinnamon, ground nutmeg and brown sugar until combined.
  3. Stir the custard mixture into the bowl with the bread until thoroughly combined. Cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes.
  4. Pre-heat the oven to 350 F, with the baking rack in the center.
  5. Into a greased 8-inch springform cake tin or small cake pan, pour the bread-custard mixture. Bake 1 hour, or until golden and puffy on top. (According to the original recipe, the pudding should “wiggle slightly” when shaken.)
  6. Allow to cool for 5 or so minutes before slicing/serving. You can also serve it at room temperature or cold with a fruit sauce, custard (yum…), ice cream or whipped cream.

Almond Prune Rye Bread

Does that combination sound odd to anyone else? Maybe it’s the word “prune”—it brings to mind images of old, wrinkly things (and old, wrinkly people), porridge, digestive problems…

Then again, the little baker in me also thinks of pleasant things like French armagnac tart, elegant frangipane and custardy clafoutis.

Whatever your initial reaction, please, please don’t let it stop you from trying this recipe. It’s, to say the least, intriguing…especially because of the caraway seeds and rye. I don’t even LIKE caraway seeds or rye bread. However, together with the sweet prunes and mild almonds, the flavors work. Really well. The original recipe called for cranberries and pecans; I wonder how they would work with the caraway and rye. Or what if I use rosemary instead of caraway next time? Now that is a combination worth getting excited about. 😛

So as I mentioned in my last post, I’m making an effort to bake organic on a budget and which I tried do with this bread. So, I’m not sure it was really worth it as I don’t think I actually saved anything: $2 for the bus, plus around $8 for the flour, the nuts and the prunes (were they watered with liquid gold or what). Oh, I want to be good to my body and to the environment so bad—but it it’s hard! I have to remember to think about the big picture: pay now or pay (exorbitant medical bills) later.

As for the process, I have no issues to report. Though, I did fight it out with the dough for about 30 minutes, having to knead by hand. But in the end, I won. Look at that loaf!! Crispy on the outside and chewy and aromatic on the inside.

Enjoy!

Almond Prune Rye Bread (adapted from Bake at 350’s version of a Martha Stewart recipe)

INGREDIENTS

1 cup almonds, roughly chopped

vegetable oil, for greasing the bowl

1 1/4 cups lukewarm water

2 1/4 tsp instant yeast (or 2 1/2, plus 1/8 if using active dry)

2 cups bread flour

2 cups rye flour

2 tsp salt (the original called for 2 1/2; this seems a bit excessive to me)

2 tbsp organic evaporated cane sugar (original called for 1 tbsp)

1 1/2 tbsp caraway seeds (will add half that amount next time)

3/4 cup prunes, coarsely chopped

1 large egg, plus 1 tbsp water, for egg wash

sea salt for sprinkling (forgot to do this, but jeez, enough salt already!)

METHOD

  1. In a large mixing bowl, stir together the yeast, flours, salt, sugar and caraway seeds. Add the water and mix with the paddle attachment on medium low until the dough comes together. (If using active dry yeast, activate the yeast in 1/2 cup lukewarm water—not above 105 F–by letting it sit for about 10 minutes, or until really foamy. Remember to reduce the amount of water you add later to 3/4 cup.)
  2. Switch to the dough hook and mix on medium speed, about 4-5 minutes, or until the dough is smooth and elastic. On low speed, add the cranberries and pecans. Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled bowl, cover with oiled plastic wrap (to prevent sticking) and let sit about 1 hour, or until doubled in bulk.
  3. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface. (I used my Silpat; it’s a good reference for gauging size.) Roll out to a 13×10 inch rectangle, with the short side facing you. Fold in 1/2 inch flaps at each corner, i.e. doggy-ear the corners. Starting at the top, roll the dough towards you, gently pressing as you go to form a tight log. (Again, the Silpat is really helpful for this.) Roll back and forth gently to seal the bottom seam. Transfer the loaf to a baking sheet lined with parchment (or temporarily onto a cutting board and back onto your Silpat), cover and let sit for 45 minutes.
  4. Pre-heat the oven to 350 F (175 C).
  5. Beat the egg with 1 tbsp water. Brush the loaf generously with the egg wash and sprinkle with sea salt. Bake until the crust is a deep, golden brown, 35-40 minutes. (I rotated my loaf halfway through to ensure even baking.) Transfer to a wire rack and let cool completely before slicing.